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Purpose:Building upon the skills that you’ve learned in Labs 01 through 07, your task is to design a functional multi-page website. The purpose of this website will be to communicate your focused refl

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Purpose:Building upon the skills that you’ve learned in Labs 01 through 07, your task is to design a
functional multi-page website. The purpose of this website will be to communicate your focused
reflection on Weinberger’s Small pieces loosely joined.
Content: To develop your reflection, you are welcome to focus on the particular chapter that was
assigned to your presentation group. Or you can focus on other chapters from the book, or even on
Weinberger’s book as a whole (i.e. you can comment on the nature of his very thesis). In particul...

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Question Preview:

Purpose:Building upon the skills that you’ve learned in Labs 01 through 07, your task is to design a
functional multi-page website. The purpose of this website will be to communicate your focused
reflection on Weinberger’s Small pieces loosely joined.
Content: To develop your reflection, you are welcome to focus on the particular chapter that was
assigned to your presentation group. Or you can focus on other chapters from the book, or even on
Weinberger’s book as a whole (i.e. you can comment on the nature of his very thesis). In particular, you
are encouraged to reflect upon the fact that Weinberger’s work was published in 2002, and thus written
more than fifteen years ago. In producing your reflection, here are some key questions for you to ask:
(1) What was Weinberger trying to communicate to his readers? I.e. what was he trying to say
about the emerging phenomenon of the Web, especially in its effects on society and culture?
(2) Looking back, fifteen years later, does our everyday experience of “the Web” prove
Weinberger’s analysis to be correct? To be false? Both?
(3) What specific evidence are you considering in formulating your analysis of Weinberger? I.e.
are you considering any specific websites? Are you thinking about the work of any specific
designers, whether anonymous or named? About design trends and developments? To answer
these questions, you can focus on a single well-chosen topic (e.g. the “pop-up window” example
that I spoke about in class).
Length: In developing and communicating your reflection, you are also encouraged to be brief; i.e.
this is not an essay. You might think of it more like a “triptych;” i.e. as three inter-related screens. The
screens needn’t “scroll down” (unless you really want them to); which is to say that you’re only expected to
produce a few paragraphs of text for each of your html pages.
References: In formulating your analysis, academic references are not necessary. However, if an
academic source does prove useful for your reflection, you should cite the work in a meaningful way (i.e.
so that your reader can find the original source if s/he desires to read more on the subject). With that
being said: your website should definitely be “referential.” E.g. if you’re referring to a specific web page as
a particular instance that you think is important in your reflection on Weinberger, you should definitely
embed a link to that page inside of your text.
Grading rubric:
Technical requirements (70%):
• Can your site be accessed on the World Wide Web? I.e. is it hosted live on a server?
• Is your site functional? E.g. are the internal links active (in a coherent way)?
• Do you have an external CSS file? (NB: The only inline styling that is permissible is that which
we’ve learned in the labs).
• Do you have a functional home page (i.e. index.html)? In addition to your home page, do you
have at least three secondary pages?
• Links: Have you embedded at least two external links into your text?
• Multimedia: Have you incorporated a video file? Have you embedded at least two images?
Style (15%):
• Does your multi-page website display a sense of proportion? Of coherence?
• Have you been able to produce a layout that is meaningful and navigable? E.g. is there an
ubiquitous navigation menu?
• Are your design choices thoughtful (e.g. selection of media files, colour choices, use of lists or
tables, if necessary)? Do they support the content of your reflection?
Reflection (15%):
• Have you clearly articulated a focused reflection upon Small pieces loosely joined?
• Have you referred to particular phenomena to ensure that your reflection isn’t merely an opinion?
I.e. have you provided evidence / focused on a particular case study?
• Have you approached your reflection from a “design perspective”? I.e. in your analysis of
Weinberger, are you thinking about: problem spaces, design solutions, users, etc.?
Procedures (after having sketched and then coded your site—and tested it locally):
1. Create a folder in your Phoenix CPanel entitled “final” (and please watch your spelling). Place all
of your files for this final project within this particular folder on the server.
2. As is customary, name your home page “index.html.”
3. Your secondary pages can be named at your discretion. NB: it’s good practice (i) to keep the file
names for these secondary pages short, (ii) to not use spaces in the file names (e.g.
myReflection.html or my-reflection.html), and (iii) to use file names that are evocative of the
content that appears on that page. Of course, you’ll need to link to these secondary pages to
produce functional links, so remember that precise spelling is mandatory.
4. Also be sure to upload your .css file to the same folder and ensure that the link to your style sheet
in the corresponds to this file name.
5. You should now be able to test your site on a live browser (i.e. by visiting
“http://phoenix.sheridanc.on.ca/~ccit####/final”). Try using multiple browsers.
6. Once you are satisfied with your website, cut-and-paste the URL into a .txt file and submit this
file into your assignment folder on Slate. The .txt file should be named according to the first
initial of your first name, followed by your last name with a capitalized first initial (e.g.
jRovito.txt).

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